archive-be.com » BE » V » VIB-UGENT.BE

Total: 357

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • “Nitric oxide production and signaling in plants”
    signaling molecule throughout the lifespan of a plant The complexity of the underlying signaling events are just starting to be unraveled One of the most important regulatory mechanisms of NO is S nitrosylation the covalent attachment of NO to cysteine residues Although the involvement of cysteine S nitrosylation in the regulation of protein functions is well established its substrate specificity remains unknown Identification of candidates for S nitrosylation and their target cysteine residues is fundamental for studying the molecular mechanisms and regulatory roles of S nitrosylation Several case studies will be presented The basis for nitric oxide signaling the production of the signaling molecule itself is far from being understood in plants While in animals several NO synthases NOS isoforms are responsible for NO production in immunity and physiology in higher plants no corresponding enzymes are known so far More than half a dozen NO productive reactions have been observed in plants but only few of them have been thoroughly investigated It remains to be elucidated how these parts act together to form the sophisticated NO signaling network observed in plants Recent findings suggest plant specific pathways regarding NO production Location Jozef Schell seminar room Contact Prof Jörg Durner Institute

    Original URL path: http://www.psb.vib-ugent.be/seminars/icalrepeat.detail/2015/01/23/142/-/nitric-oxide-production-and-signaling-in-plants (2016-04-26)
    Open archived version from archive


  • “Traffic control for plant immunity and receptor kinases”
    focus has been how transport processes regulate defence activation Combining genetic molecular and biochemical approaches with cell biology we have comprehensively dissected the subcellular transport pathways dependent upon microbial stimulation Our studies have revealed that clathrin and ESCRT mediated endosomal trafficking is required for plant defence and is important for stomatal immunity To identify mechanistic and functional elements of transport regulated immunity we focus on how the pattern recognition receptors PRRs the primary sensors of the plant s immune system are transported through the cell PRRs are receptor kinases and receptor like proteins that must be presented at the plasma membrane to recognize potentially infectious pathogens and trigger immunity We found that PRRs representing different protein families are endocytosed in a ligand induced and BAK1 SERK3 co receptor dependent manner Together with the finding that activated PRRs FLS2 EFR PEPR1 traffic via a common endosomal pathway this suggests a role of endocytosis in the regulation of receptor abundance at the plasma membrane triggered by ligand perception Furthermore endocytosis of activated FLS2 is mediated by clathrin and involves sorting by the ESCRT machinery This indicates a link between transport processes involved in defence and PRR trafficking Understanding these mechanisms is providing

    Original URL path: http://www.psb.vib-ugent.be/seminars/icalrepeat.detail/2015/01/27/143/-/traffic-control-for-plant-immunity-and-receptor-kinases (2016-04-26)
    Open archived version from archive

  • “Transcriptional control of root hair growth under adverse conditions”
    a screening to identify key transcriptional regulators of growth using the highly plastic root hairs as a model A collection of 1 400 transcription factors that were dominantly repressed by fusion to the SUPERMAN repression domain was screened for root hair growth phenotypes Our screen revealed several previously uncharacterized transcription factors Further characterization of our candidates revealed OBP4 a DOF type transcription factor as a repressor of root hair growth OBP4 is expressed mainly in expanding and mature cells and is induced by unfavorable environmental factors and the stress hormone abscisic acid ABA We identified a bHLH transcription factor ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE LIKE 2 RSL2 as one of the potential direct targets of OBP4 needed for ABA dependent root hair growth control Interestingly phosphate limitation a major enhancer of root hair growth did not affect the expression of RSL2 or OBP4 However the activity of another transcriptional regulator GT2 LIKE 1 GTL1 is positively correlated with phosphate supply Moreover GTL1 activity proved to be needed for phosphate dependent root hair growth likely through regulation of another bHLH transcription factor ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE LIKE 4 RSL4 Currently we are working toward a mechanistic model in which OBP4 dependent and GTL1 dependent

    Original URL path: http://www.psb.vib-ugent.be/seminars/icalrepeat.detail/2015/02/03/144/-/transcriptional-control-of-root-hair-growth-under-adverse-conditions (2016-04-26)
    Open archived version from archive

  • "New insight into monolignol biosynthesis and coupling, and perspectives for the biorefinery"
    Save ical Preserve formatting in description only supported in some calendar applications Close Thursday 12 February 2015 11 00am 12 30pm ABSTRACT Lignin is an aromatic heteropolymer that is mostly present in secondary thickened cell walls where it provides rigidity and imperviousness allowing plants to grow upward and transport water and nutrients over large distances However for the production of fermentable sugars from the biomass in the biorefinery this polymer needs to be extracted by chemical treatments and this costly pretreatment is one of the main hurdles that currently hampers the transition from a fossil based to a bio based economy By a systems biology approach in Arabidopsis we have been able to identify new genes of the lignin biosynthesis pathway that open up very promising avenues to decrease biomass recalcitrance towards processing This will be illustrated by translational research in poplar In addition our fundamental work involving mutant analysis and metabolic profiling revealed that monolignols are not only polymerized in the cell wall but also in the cytoplasm Location Jozef Schell seminar room Contact Prof Wout Boerjan VIB nDept of Plant Systems Biology nGhent University nGent nBELGIUM n Back PSB Missions The Department Infrastructure Core Facilities International Projects Publications

    Original URL path: http://www.psb.vib-ugent.be/seminars/icalrepeat.detail/2015/02/12/145/-/new-insight-into-monolignol-biosynthesis-and-coupling-and-perspectives-for-the-biorefinery (2016-04-26)
    Open archived version from archive

  • "Triggers and suppressors of plant immunity to downy mildew"
    of secreted protein have been identified in oomycetes that are targeted to the plant host to aid the infection process In my seminar I will discuss the NLP group of secreted proteins that were found to be strong inducers of innate immunity in Arabidopsis A putative receptor and co receptor were identified that mediate recognition of a small and conserved NLP peptide domain To suppress innate immune responses oomycetes have evolved host translocated effectors that act inside plant cells We study the mode of action of RXLR effectors of the downy mildew of Arabidopsis but also of lettuce and spinach On the other hand also host plants need mechanisms to control their immune responses In Arabidopsis we have identified an important negative regulator of immunity DMR6 a 2OG oxygenase dmr6 mutants are resistant to downy mildew and other pathogens whereas DMR6 overexpression lines are more susceptible Phylogenetic analysis revealed a subgroup of DMR6 like oxygenases DLOs Overexpression of DLO1 and DLO2 could complement resistance of the dmr6 mutant The dmr6 3 dlo1 double mutant that is completely resistant to H arabidopsidis showed growth reduction associated with high levels of salicylic acid We conclude that DMR6 and DLO1 act redundantly as

    Original URL path: http://www.psb.vib-ugent.be/seminars/icalrepeat.detail/2015/02/26/146/-/triggers-and-suppressors-of-plant-immunity-to-downy-mildew (2016-04-26)
    Open archived version from archive

  • "Ancient and essential: the assembly of iron–sulfur clusters in plants"
    applications Close Thursday 05 March 2015 02 00pm 03 30pm ABSTRACT The assembly of iron sulfur Fe S clusters requires dedicated protein factors inside the living cell Striking similarities between prokaryotic and eukaryotic assembly proteins suggest that plant cells inherited two different pathways through endosymbiosis the ISC pathway in mitochondria and the SUF pathway in plastids Important Fe S proteins are also found in the cytosol and nucleus such as DNA repair enzymes and polymerases which require additional proteins for Fe S cluster assembly Over the past years we have investigated the functional relationship between the compartmentalized assembly pathways We found that the mitochondria but not the plastids are required for Fe S enzymes in the cytosol and nucleus The mitochondria are thought to be the source of sulfur provided by the cysteine desulfurase NFS1 The ATP binding cassette transporter of the mitochondria ATM3 is capable of exporting sulfur in the form of glutathione trisulfide We are further characterizing the cytosolic assembly proteins downstream of ATM3 to unravel in detail what links mitochondria to the maintenance of nuclear genome integrity Location Jozef Schell seminar room Contact Dr Janneke Balk John Innes Centre University of East Anglia nNorwich nUNITED KINGDOM Back

    Original URL path: http://www.psb.vib-ugent.be/seminars/icalrepeat.detail/2015/03/05/147/-/ancient-and-essential-the-assembly-of-iron-sulfur-clusters-in-plants (2016-04-26)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Title to be announced
    Send to Yahoo Calendar Save ical Preserve formatting in description only supported in some calendar applications Close Wednesday 18 March 2015 02 00pm 03 30pm ABSTRACT Location Jozef Schell seminar room Contact Prof Frank Van Breusegem VIB Dept of Plant Systems Biology nGhent University nGent nBELGIUM n Back PSB Missions The Department Infrastructure Core Facilities International Projects Publications News Seminars About PSB PSB Missions The Department Infrastructure Core Facilities International

    Original URL path: http://www.psb.vib-ugent.be/seminars/icalrepeat.detail/2015/03/18/99/-/title-to-be-announced (2016-04-26)
    Open archived version from archive

  • “Plant-Microbe Interactions: The good, the bad and the evil”
    typical plant pathogens such as Pseudomonas syringae we are interested in extreme cases of plant microbe interactions such as Salmonella typhimurium one of the major causes of food poisoning and death in humans S typhimurium is often found in soil samples and can infect and propagate both in animals and plants1 S typhimurium was found to apply a plethora of strategies to infect plants some of which are specific to plants and other are equally used to suppress the human innate immune system2 When bacterial pathogens infect plant leaves they enter through stomata In contrast to abiotic signals which are mediated by ABA we found that stomata have developed a largely independent signalling system for pathogen detection3 4 However soil also hosts and study rhizosphere microbes from plants living in different deserts of the world that enable plants to survive under extreme conditions http www darwin21 net 5 We established different screening protocols for testing the microbial capacity to transfer stress tolerance to crop plants and try to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms for developing new concepts of sustainable agriculture in arid regions of the world References 1 Tyler HL Triplett EW 2008 Plants as a habitat for beneficial and or human pathogenic bacteria Ann Rev Phytopathol 46 53 73 2 García AV Hirt H 2014 Salmonella enterica induces and subverts the plant immune system Front Microbiol 5 141 3 Montillet JL Leonhardt N Mondy S Tranchimand S Rumeau D Boudsocq M Garcia AV Douki T Bigeard J Laurière C Chevalier A Castresana C Hirt H 2013 An abscisic acid independent oxylipin pathway controls stomatal closure and immune defense in Arabidopsis PLoS Biol 3 e1001513 4 Montillet JL Hirt H 2013 New checkpoints in stomatal defense Trends Plant Sci 6 295 7 5 de Zelicourt A Al Yousif M Hirt

    Original URL path: http://www.psb.vib-ugent.be/seminars/icalrepeat.detail/2015/03/23/148/-/plant-microbe-interactions-the-good-the-bad-and-the-evil (2016-04-26)
    Open archived version from archive