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  • Boscombe Down Aircraft Collection
    cooperation with the Army units in Southern Command Initially equipped with Bristol Fighters it subsequently received the Armstrong Whitworth Atlas in January 1931 and Audaxes in December 1933 With these types it took part in exercises all over Southern England In June 1938 it became the first unit equipped with the Westland Lysander The mid 1930 s saw the beginning of the RAF expansion scheme where many First World War airfield sites were inspected to see if they would be suitable for the new permanent stations which were planned due to the increased threat from Nazi Germany to Britain Old Sarum Airfield was identified as being suitable for becoming a permanent station and the period between 1934 and 1937 saw the development of new domestic administrative and technical buildings This development saw also the increase in the area of the airfield occupied by station buildings from 7 5 ha to roughly 22 ha The flying field remained the same size Three other operational squadrons were based at the airfield during varying periods between 1935 and 1939 First of these was another army cooperation unit 13th Squadron whose Audaxes were based here from May 1935 Next came the Hawker Hinds of a new light bomber squadron the 107th Squadron which stayed here until 1937 The third unit 59th Squadron was actually formed here in June 1937 and was a brand new army cooperation unit especially intended to carry out night reconnaissance using Hawker Hector aircraft Subsequently it was decided to replace these with comparatively high performance Bristol Blenheims and in May 1939 the squadron transferred to Andover to make the transition World War II At the outbreak of the second war the appearance of RAF Old Sarum had changed little Its line of hangars still looked out onto the grass flying field while the old Roman road still formed the northern border of the airfield The squadron continued to be primarily engaged in training and developing ground support techniques including the spraying of poison gas although this was never actually used In February the 16th Squadron left for France via Hawkinge and its place was taken by the first two Canadian flying units to arrive in Britain the 110th and 112th Royal Canadian Air Force RCAF Squadrons The final operational unit to be based here during this period was 225th Squadron RAF another Lysander equipped unit This took the place of 110th RCAF Squadron on June9th 1940 and with the growing threat of a Nazi invasion of the Britain it was engaged in patrolling the south coast for enemy landings In 1939 the establishment of aircraft was increased to serve the expanding School of Army Cooperation In February 1940 a new D Flight was formed within the School for artillery spotting duties It was out stationed at Larkhill to be close to the Royal Artillery camp there and served as the nucleus from which all future Air Observation Post AOP units originated During the Battle of Britain as losses mounted the shortage of fighter pilots became so desperate that a number of army cooperation trainees were selected at Old Sarum and immediately sent to Hurricane and Spitfire training units During the massive campaign of enemy attacks on RAF airfields in the summer and autumn of 1940 Old Sarum escaped lightly but during the night of 11 to 12 May 1941 one hangar was burnt out in an air raid and two aircraft were destroyed During the first two years of the war it became clear that higher performance aircraft were needed and so a small number of Hurricanes and Harvards joined the unit in early 1941 and they were soon followed by a flight of Tomahawks Because of the limitations of the landing ground at Old Sarum a larger satellite was prepared at Oatlands Hill some 8 km away to the north west Oatlands Hill was equipped with only basic flying facilities and most of the maintenance work had still to be undertaken at Old Sarum but henceforth all higher performance aircraft would carry out their training programs at Oatlands Hill In August 1941 the first full AOP squadron was formed This was 651th Squadron and it was equipped with Taylorcrafts flown by specially trained army pilots They were frequently detached to Larkhill to train with the gunners there and in the following spring the squadron joined Army maneuvers thus establishing the practice of sending small detachments of aircraft to improvised advanced landing grounds in the field The advances in size and performance of aircraft types from Lysander to the Tomahawk prompted a reorganization and the Training Wing was designated 41 Operational Training Unit The development and teaching of methods of artillery reconnaissance were undertaken there from 1942 However these activities required a permanent runway instead of a flying field and so 41 OTU was transferred out in 1942 It was replaced by a new Fleet Air Arm Squadron developing tactical reconnaissance In 1942 Old Sarum became the principal base for the training of AOP with three new squadrons and 43 OTU moved from Larkhill to Old Sarum While it was engaged in training new pilots the facilities at Old Sarum continued to be used for the formation of new Auster squadrons 655th Squadron formed in December 1942 for Southern Command and took part in the huge Spartan exercise in East Anglia in July 1943 which tested the efficiency of Army co operation squadrons under mobile conditions and was effectively a rehearsal for the invasion and liberation of North West Europe This led to the formation of Tactical Air Forces TAF which were created as replacements for RAF Army Cooperation Command 1944 marked the end of a period of major expansion in the AOP squadrons and the spare hangar space at Old Sarum Airfield was used by 3505 Servicing Unit which maintained numerous aircraft operating in small and scattered detachments to provide practice facilities for Anti Aircraft and Searchlight sites Plans for the D Day landings were well advanced by early

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  • Vigna di Valle
    Forces Associations other groups and organizations school children and individual visitors Each year the Museum is used for important cultural events like concerts openings of art exhibitions seminars meetings and press conferences Bookshop Like every good museum Vigna di Valle also has a souvenir and a bookshop Really important for the aviation minded visitors to get the mandatory souvenirs In the Museum s bookshop you can purchase a wide range of items related to the Air Force and to flying model aircraft books key rings T shirts caps and model aircraft assembly kits Also clothing items and games connected with the world of flying are available there Some History At the initiative of the then major Giulio Douhet commander of the Battalion of Engineers the first aviation exhibition to be put on display in Italy was mounted in 1913 in Castel S Angelo in Roma where the Historical Museum of the Engineering Corps was located It brought together all of the aviation related material in Italy from 1884 the date of the establishment in Rome of the first Aerostat section part of the Corps of Engineers onwards In 1933 ten years after the Air Force had been established as one of the Italian Armed Forces the material on display at Castel S Angelo was moved to the barracks of the lower Battery next to the river Tiber in Rome and then later transferred to a more appropriate location on Lungotevere delle Vittorie in 1939 Regrettably a great deal of aviation material of extremely great interest particularly aircraft and engines was destroyed during and immediately after the Second World War In the years of reconstruction of Italy from 1950 onwards the idea surfaced again of setting up a Historical Aviation Museum similar to those that other countries had established or were in the process of establishing So the first searches for an appropriate site for a permanent museum began But what was found was only partly suitable and temporary and did not meet the requirements of an appropriate space to house properly the historical aircraft engines and the numerous mementos held by the Armed Forces In 1961 the first location for the Air Force Historical Museum was found in the Palazzo della Vela in Turin The Air Force rented the building up until 1974 at which point the local authorities asked for it to be handed back as they had decided another use for it Another idea of setting up an Aviation Section in the Science and Technology Museum in Milan came to life because of the very high cost of building all the necessary infrastructure from scratch As a result the aviation material held by the Air Force was moved virtually entirely to the airport at Vigna di Valle where a center for the collection of historical and scientific material related to flight had already been set up The final solution had not yet been found but there was an increasingly urgent need for the Air Force to find an

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  • Nationaal Militair Museum Soesterberg
    in the Netherlands Building 45 Collections The NMM collections encompass artifacts ranging from arrowheads from the Stone Age through swords and armours from the Middle Ages untill the present weapon systems of the Netherlands defence Forces Airplanes canons and tanks including seven jets involved in a dogfight a Leopard 1V and 2 combat tanks a M270 Multiple Launch Rocket System A masterpiece in this collection is a V2 rocket which the Germans used at the end of the Second World War to bomb Southern Netherland Belgium and England The V2 was the first operational rocket and Netherland was the first country from which these rockets were fired Regarding the aviation side there is an enormous difference with the former Aviation Museum whos closed his doors in 2013 A great part af the former collections is no more exhibed Let s hope that the actual museum will grow up and give the capacity to show all the treasures we could see in the past To give you an idea of the differences you can see our 2013 report by a simple click on http www sbap be museum soesterberg soesterberg htm The inauguration on December 11th 2015 Courtesy Nationaal Militair Museum His Majesty King Willem Alexander and Queen Maxima Courtesy Nationaal Militair Museum Netherland Forces today Jacques Vincent Jacques Vincent Jacques Vincent Jacques Vincent Jacques Vincent Jacques Vincent Courtesy Nationaal Militair Museum Henri Farman HF 22 Jacques Vincent Fokker D VII Bruno Ghils Jacques Vincent Jacques Vincent Koolhoven F K 51 Jacques Vincent Aviolanda Curtiss P 6 Hawk I Jacques Vincent Jacques Vincent Bruno Ghils Brewster B 339C Buffalo replica Jacques Vincent V 1 Flying bomb Jacques Vincent Supermarine Spitfire LF IX Bruno Ghils Lockheed 12A Jacques Vincent North American P 51K Mustang Jacques Vincent North American B 25J Mitchell Jacques Vincent Jacques Vincent Bruno Ghils De Havilland DH 82A Tiger Moth Jacques Vincent Douglas C 47A Dakota Jacques Vincent Hiller OH 23C Raven Jacques Vincent Gloster Meteor F 4 Jacques Vincent Bruno Ghils Bruno Ghils Republic F 84F Thunderstreak Jacques Vincent Hawker Hunter F 4 Jacques Vincent Jacques Vincent Bruno Ghils Lockheed F 104G Starfighter Jacques Vincent Northrop NF 5A Freedom fighter Bruno Ghils Jacques Vincent Sud Aviation SE3160 Alouette III Jacques Vincent Bolkow Bo 105CB 4 Jacques Vincent Jacques Vincent Lockheed Martin F 16A Jacques Vincent McDonnell Douglas F 15A Eagle Bruno Ghils Jacques Vincent When the Air Force meet the Navy Bruno Ghils The Royal Dutch Navy in the golden years Bruno Ghils Hawker Sea Furry Mk 50 Jacques Vincent Jacques Vincent Bruno Ghils Hawker Sea Hawk FGA 6 Jacques Vincent Sikorsky S 58 Bruno Ghils Jacques Vincent Bruno Ghils Dornier Do 24T 3 Jacques Vincent A beautiful presentation of engines Jacques Vincent Bruno Ghils Jacques Vincent Jacques Vincent Bruno Ghils Fokker F 27 300M Troopship Bruno Ghils Jacques Vincent Jacques Vincent Lockheed SP 2H Neptune Jacques Vincent Brequet Atlantic Jacques Vincent Jacques Vincent Bruno Ghils North American F 86F Sabre Jacques Vincent Convair F 102A Delta Dagger

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  • De Havilland Air Museum
    Major The engine fuselage combination continued to be produced during World War Two and formed part of the Queen Bee radio controlled target aircraft The Gipsy Moth was re designed in 1931 to meet an Air Ministry specification for a trainer for the RAF The new aircraft combined several features from previous members of the Moth family and re used the name of an earlier aircraft It became one of the most famous aircraft of all time the DH 82 Tiger Moth DH 82A Tiger Moth powered by a Gipsy Major 130 Hp engine Marc Arys As de Havilland and his wife were getting tired of flying in aircraft with open cockpits he designed a range of touring aircraft with enclosed cockpits These included the Puss Moth Leopard Moth and Hornet Moth They were not as cheap as the Gipsy Moth but provided a higher level of comfort The DH 87B Hornet Moth G ADOT was the last of the original 87A s with its maiden flight done by Geoffrey de Havilland on November 14 1935 This aircraft was later converted to DH 87B standard Marc Arys The number of aircraft produced and encroachment by housing meant that the company could not continue at Stag Lane In 1932 the factory moved to new premises at Hatfield Hertfordshire The Stag Lane airfield was officially closed in 1934 but the factory was retained for the production of engines The de Havilland company continued to develop economical light transports There was the Dragon of 1932 and the even more successful DH 89 Dragon Rapide of 1934 bottom left These aircraft could pay their way without subsidy The England Australia race in 1934 led to the creation of the Comet DH 88 a two seater racer with two Gipsy Six engines The Comet won the race against stiff international competition by flying to Melbourne in 70 hours 54 minutes bottom right The all wood construction DH 89A Dragon Rapide was desighned as a short range airliner carrying up to eight passengers 728 were built for commercial and military use the latter as the Dominie Marc Arys DH 88 Comet racer designed for the 1934 Mc Robertson Air Race Marc Arys In 1935 arising from another lesson of the great race in 1934 de Havilland acquired the manufacturing rights for the Hamilton variable pitch propeller and production commenced in June that year At the outbreak of war the propeller plants at Edgware and in Bolton were the only source of full scale production in the country and the propeller division produced the major share of all the variable pitch propellers used on British aircraft during the war In April 1946 the propeller division became a separate company de Havilland Propellers Ltd After long drawn discussion the de Havilland Company succeeded in 1936 in obtaining an order for a modern high speed transport aircraft largely developed from the valuable lessons learned from the Comet Racer This was the Albatross airliner but its development and that of the smaller all metal Flamingo of 1938 were thwarted by the war The Mosquito was the company s foremost contribution to the war of 1939 45 Almost 8 000 were built in England Canada and Australia It was the fastest aircraft on any front from September 1941 until early 1944 and more than 40 variants were produced In addition to the Mosquito almost 4 000 Tiger Moths and some 2 000 other aircraft were produced also 10 000 Gipsy engines and 140 000 propellers In the winter of 1940 41 het decision was made to embark on the gas turbine engine design and de Havilland became the first of the established aero engine builders in Britain to undertake the design of a jet engine specifically for production One year later on April 13 1942 at Hatfield the prototype Goblin ran for the first time Goblin engines became airborne powering a Gloster Meteor in March 1943 In January 1945 the Goblin became the first jet engine to pass the Air Ministry type approval tests Because of the expanding prospects it was decided to form a separate company and in February 1944 the de Havilland Engine Co Ltd came into being The Goblin engine which powered the Gloster Meteor in March 1943 Marc Arys The Vampire jet fighter designed around the Goblin first flew in September 1943 exceeding 500 m p h and was the first aircraft British or American to do so by a handsome margin The Vampire fighter bomber saw extensive service and was adopted by more than a score of the world s air forces while its successor the Vampire Trainer became the standard advanced trainer for the Royal Navy and the Royal Air Force as well as for many overseas air forces De Havilland DH 100 DH 115 Vampire Marc Arys The Vampire as an operational fighter gave way to the Venom with the Ghost engine The Venom was also developed and produced as a single seat and two seat naval fighter The last de Havilland fighter was the DH 110 Sea Vixen a transonic two seat all weather fighter with two Rolls Royce Avon engines and which by 1957 was in production for the Royal Navy D e Havilland DH 110 Sea Vixen Marc Arys The growing demand for increased power led to the development of the larger Ghost engine It was this engine the first civil certified jet engine which introduced the development of the Comet jet airliner The commercial Ghost developing 4 45O lb of thrust was flight tested in a modified Lancaster A further development was announced in 1953 when the existence of a new axial flow engine called the Gyron was made known It was tested with reheat at 25 000 lb of thrust A more powerful de Havilland Ghost engine was developed for the Venoms and became the world s first commercial jet engine for the Comet airliner The engine was tested in a modified Lancaster and is seen flying on jet power with the inner pair of Merlins stopped Two years later in September 1955 the existence of the Gyron Junior was revealed This smaller engine based on the same formula as the larger Gyron passed its type tests in less than a year from the date of its first run The Gyron Junior developing 7 100 lb of thrust was flight tested in a Canberra and a Javelin before entering service in the Blackburn Buccaneer S Mk 1 In 1946 the de Havilland Engine Co Ltd had established a Rocket Division for the development of liquid rocket engines the first of which was the Sprite designed for assisted take off A development the Super Sprite was in production as an assisted take off engine for the R A F V bombers A later development in this field was the Spectre A rocket engine designed as a prime means of propulsion in its own rights also as part of a mixed plant combining jet turbine and rocket engines for high supersonic fighters operating at high altitudes An assisted take off variant of the Spectre was also adopted for the R A F V bombers In 1952 it was announced the de Havilland Propellers was engaged in work on guided weapons and in 1957 the company was permitted to announce that its infra red air to air missile the Firestreak was in production Also that it was concerned in the development of ballistic missile Parallel with this turbine and rocket development the range of Gipsy engines was continued The Gipsy Major reached a high pitch of efficiency and in its latest form it was adapted for use in light helicopters The six cylinder Gipsy Queen was produced in two forms the Gipsy Queen 30 of 250 h p and the Gipsy Queen 70 of 380 h p In 1956 the Gipsy Major engine was completely redesigned to become the Gipsy 215 for helicopter applications This fuel injection engine developed 215 Hp and was used to power the Saro Skeeter two seat light helicopter of which 77 were built mainly for the British Army De Havilland s re entry into the civil market after the war was made with the Dove A light transport powered by two Gipsy Queen 70 engines with de Havilland propellers The Dove first flew in September 1945 and sold readily throughout the world not least in the United States where it was imported mainly for executive travel Next was the Heron in 1950 A small four engined transport with Gipsy Queen 30 engines and de Havilland propellers Intended for short haul branch line service and executive duties DH 104 Dove built as a C1 Devon Marc Arys After the war the de Havilland companies in Canada and Australia set about the production of aircraft designed to meet the local requirements In Australia the three engined Drover D H A 3 was employed in the Flying Doctors Service whilst in Canada other designs occupied the company s efforts in post war period up to 1958 The first the Chipmunk trainer D H C 1 was built in large numbers in Canada and England The Beaver D H C 2 was primarily intended for the bush flyer in the northern territories but its robust simplicity and excellent performance made it popular overseas and it was adopted as a liaison aircraft for the United States Army and sold for civil use in many countries The main civil preoccupation of the de Havilland Co Ltd in Britain in the years following the war had been the design and development of the world s first jet airliner Work on the DH 106 Comet began in 1946 The first of two Comet prototypes were hand built in the Experimental Department at Hatfield and the first prototype was rolled out on April 02 1949 just fitted with the port pair of Avon engines The aircraft fitted with all four de Havilland Ghost engines made its first flight on July 27 1949 under the command of John Cunningham the chief test pilot Less than three years later on May 02 1952 the first jet passenger service in the world was inaugurated by the British Overseas Airways Corporation B O A C At the conclusion of the first twelve months of operation during which services were operated to Johannesburg Ceylon Singapore and Tokyo B O A C Comets were flying 122 000 miles per week The wordl first commercial jet airliner had the wings swept back 20 degrees and was able to carry up to 36 passengers at over 500 m p h In the early months of 1954 after some 35 000 hours of test and airline flying two accidents to B O A C Comets 1 s resulted in the suspension of services The cause was found to be a hitherto unsuspected manifestation of metal fatigue in the skin of the pressure cabin An improved version of the Comet the Series 2 with Rolls Royce engines was produced in 1953 In February 1955 an order was placed for ten Comet 2 s for use by Transport Command of the R A F with the first aircraft being delivered in the latter half of 1956 By the end of 1957 the Comets of Transport Command were flying half a million miles a month on services to Australia the Pacific Islands and elsewhere Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II made her first jet flight in a R A F Comet The next stage was the Comet 3 development aircraft for the Comet 4 a new design which was announced on March 17 1955 The B O A C placed an order for nineteen Comet 4 s This airliner equipped with four Rolls Royce Avon engines carried up to 76 passengers on stages of 3 000 miles at a cruising speed of 500 m p h The last Comet commercial flight with B O A C was in November 1965 and the fleet was either acquired by MSA or DAN Air BOAC ordered 19 of the new Comet 4S and two of these inaugurated the world s first transatlantic service between London and New York on October 4 1958 three weeks before Pan Am with the Boeing 707 The last Comet commercial fight with BOAC was in November 1965 and the flight was either acquired by MSA or Dan Air Two other Comet variants were announced during 1957 The Comet Continental 4B designed for ecnomical operations over stages ranging from 300 to 2 400 miles and the intermediate Comet 4C which combined many advantages of the Comet 4 and Comet 4B In August 1957 an order for six Comet 4B s for British European Airways B E A was announced Olympic Airways ordered also four Comet 4B s and operated these in co operation with B E A The short range high density version was the Comet 4B with a longer fuselage and shorter span wings This 101 seat version entered service with BEA on April 1 1960 Olympic Airways also ordered four Comet 4B s and operated them in co operation with BEA The ultimate commercial development was the 101 seat Comet 4C with the longer range wings of the Comet 4 giving a typical range of 2 650 miles In addition to a number of airlines world wide Sudan Airways ordered two Comet 4C s which were delivered at the end of 1962 and were the last Comets to be built at Hatfield The ultimate commercial development was the 101 seat Comet 4C with the longer range wing of the Comet 4 giving a typical range of 2 650 miles In addition to a number of airlines worldwide Sudan Airways ordered two Comet 4C s which were delivered at the end of 1962 and were the last Comets to be built at Hatfield A major development of the Comet 4 was the Rolls Royce Spey powered Nimrod maritime patrol aircraft for the R A F The Nimrod was launched on February 02 1965 with an initial order of 38 aircraft followed later on by 8 more The first delivery was in October 1969 to 236 Operational Conversion Unit at St Mawgan in Cornwall A total of 21 Nimrods were converted to Nimrod 2000 standards for service well into this century By Marc Arys The Museum The Museum s exhibit flew in 1945 as a B Mk 35 TA634 and was one of the last Mosquitos built at Hatfield powered by a pair of Merlin 114s This aircraft was later adapted for target towing as a B TT Mk 35 In November 1953 it entered service with CAACU moving to the HQ 2nd TAF in March 1956 Its final service duty was with 3CAACU at Exeter in September 1959 and upon its retirement it was flown to Speke Airport on the 6th November 1963 for the Liverpool Corporation to preserve in a new Terminal Complex The project did not happen and the aircraft became one of the Mosquitos that flew in the film Mosquito Squadron which took place at Bovingdon Airfield Hertfordshire during June and July 1968 It was last flown on 16th July when it was flown back to Liverpool by the late Neil Williams and on the 15th May 1971 it was officially handed over to the Museum at Salisbury Hall Serge Van Heertum Serge Van Heertum Serge Van Heertum Serge Van Heertum Serge Van Heertum Serge Van Heertum Serge Van Heertum Interior view Serge Van Heertum Control panel details Serge Van Heertum Offensive loading bomb bay and original tail code Serge Van Heertum The Museum s FB VI TA122 was one of the relatively small numbers of variants built at Hatfield It was taken on charge at 44MU on 10th March 1945 and issued to 49 ARF It was then passed 605 Squadron at Coxyde in Belgium on 3rd April soon moving to Volkel in Holland on 25th April where 605 was re numbered 4 Squadron on 31st August becoming part of the 140 Wing at Gutersloh in November 1946 In November 1948 it went to No 1 BR SD pool and as reissued to 4 Squadron on 13th January 1949 at Whan and later Celle in Germany The aircraft was finally struck off charge on 30th June 1950when it was reduced to spares The fuselage was used by Deflt University for training before being moved to the Royal Netherlands Airforce base at Gilze Rijen In November 1975 the fuselage was given to the Museum and finally delivered on 26th February 1978 The wings of this aircraft are from TR 33 TW233 recovered from Israel in 1980 Serge Van Heertum Armed nose close up Serge Van Heertum Engine Serge Van Heertum G oldsmith work Serge Van Heertum Fuselage RAF 605 Sqn code Serge Van Heertum This aircraft is the only surviving World War II prototype to be preserved in the World Designed and built at Salisbury Hall the initial DH 98 design was presented to the Air Ministry in September 1938 Development was hampered by continued Air Ministry interference who tried to impose defensive armament two rearward firing machine guns and provision for torpedoes to be carried for a maritime strike role However de Havilland disregarded these potential changes believing that their design for a fighter and fighter bomber roles were the best configuration for the Mosquito The company suffered repeated rejections from the Air Ministry Air Marshall Freeman was not convinced that the type would outperform a Spitfire or German fighters that would be deployed in the forthcoming war Finally in November 1938 an order to develop a Mosquito Prototype was granted but de Havilland were instructed that priority was to be given to the production of Tiger Moth Trainers Rapide light Transports called Dominies by the RAF and essential variable speed Airscrews for several other aircraft manufacturers The Air Ministry persisted with their demands for defensive armament suggesting that the more powerful Griffon engine might permit the installation of a four gun turret

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  • Brooklands Museum
    military aircraft at Brooklands making the site the largest aircraft manufacturing center of Britain in 1918 Many flight schools also come to settle at the site and the airfield became a flight training center during the interwar period During World War II the site is used for the production of military aircraft including the Vickers Wellington the Vickers Warwick and the Hawker Hurricane Trees are planted on some sections of the circuit to camouflage the Hawker and Vickers factories Despite these efforts the Vickers factory is severely bombed by the Luftwaffe on September 4 1940 The death toll was that nearly 90 workers were killed and at least 419 injured The premises of the Hawker factory are bombarded and damaged two days later but without any human losses or disruption of production September 21 1940 Lieutenant John McMillan Stevenson Patton of the Royal Canadian Engineers and five of his men risk their lives to move an unexploded German bomb that fell near the Hawker plant to explode into an existing bomb crater McMillan Stevenson Patton was rewarded with the award of Georges Cross The crucial role of Brooklands in the Battle of Britain in 1940 is reconstructed in an exhibition at the Brooklands Museum After the war in 1946 the circuit that was in a very poor condition was sold to Vickers to continue their aviation activities New aircraft for civil purposes are built on the site such as VC 1 Vickers Viking Vickers Valetta the Vickers Varsity the Vickers Viscount the Vickers Vanguard and Vickers VC 10 In 1951 the construction of a new runway that would allow new Vickers Valiant to take off led to the removal of part of the track The new track longer than the previous one has fewer buildings than the previous site and remained a test center for Vickers until 1972 After a considerable expansion during the 1950 s Vickers merged with the British Aircraft Corporation Fusion between English Electric and Bristol Aircraft in 1960 designs and builds the BAC TSR 2 and BAC 1 11 as well as several parts of the Concorde The factory signed a fusion contract in the mid 1970 s with the new company British Aerospace British Aerospace occupied the site until its acquisition by BAE Systems in 1989 BAE still maintains a logistics center at Brooklands today In 1987 the site welcomes the Brookland Museum dedicated to the preservation and education of the cultural heritage of the site In addition to organizing many car events since the mid 1980 s the museum also organizes regular aeronautical meetings between 1990 and 2003 using the northern half of the original track After extensive work done by the Brooklands Society entirely independent from the Brooklands museum several buildings structures and the remains of the initial track were preserved This legal protection has been reviewed by the English heritage and improved further by the DCMS in 2002 During early 2004 what remained of the Brooklands Circuit and airstrip were sold to

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  • Middle Wallop Army Flying Museum
    Army Air Corps pilots gallery The Museum Sopwith Pup N5195 The Royal engeneers First World War technicians Lest We Forget World War II pilots German field kitchen Slingsby Kirby Kite G285 General Aircraft Hotspur glider HH268 Auster AOP 5 TJ569 Authentic wrecks Airspeed AS 58 Horsa II The cockpit Airspeed AS 58 Horsa II KJ351 Inside the Horsa The Waco pilots Waco CG 4A Hadrian Operation Garden Market card Arnhem area a bridgge too far Miles M 14 Magister I T9707 Howitzer 25 pounder gun From A O P to Army Air Corps uniforms Army Air Corps pilot equipements Some historical scene Confection Observation post The life during the war Father is not there but in mission Way of life during the war Protection shelter entrance Edgar Percival EP 9 Prospector XM819 Auster AOP 9 WZ721 Auster AOP 6 WJ358 Cessna L 19A Bird Dog 111989 De Havilland Canada Beaver AL 1 XP821 Northrop MQM 36A Shelduck D 1 XZ795 Ferret Mk5 Scout Car Saro Skeeter AOP 12 XL813 Bristol Sycamore HR 14 XG502 Bell Sioux AH 1 XT108 Sud Aviation Alouette AH 2 XR232 Bell 47G 4A G AXKS Westland Scout AH 1 XP847 Aerospatiale Gazelle AH 1 ZA737 Westland Lynx AH 1 XX153 Gulf war another era Winter operations Northtern Ireland another war Gala uniform and some Borneo souvenirs Brigadier Dickie Parker one of the founder of the Army Air Corps Last generation helicopter pilot Apache Some experimental Rotabuggy 10 42 Replica The Rotachute concept Hafner Rotachute III P 5 Raoul Hafner Raoul Hafner UK Archives The beginning Born in 1905 Raoul Hafner went to school in Vienna first at the university and then at a technical college where he became interested in the rotary wing concept as a means of making aircraft land more slowly and safely He obtained a job with the Austrian Air Traffic Company but his heart was in helicopter design to which he devoted his spare time developing the R1 and R2 R for Revoplane Subsequently he gave up his job to concentrate on helicopters building the R2 in 1929 and planning the R3 But instead of constructing the latter he decided after hearing of the work of the Spanish pioneer Juan de la Cierva in England to design an autogyro incorporating the principles of the R1 and R2 The Scottish cotton millionaire Major Jack Coates who had financed Hafner s work in Vienna had the R2 shipped to Heston Aerodrome in 1933 Hafner contacted the Cierva Company and learned to fly the C 19 and C 30 autogyros He parted company with Nagler who had come from Austria with him and concentrated on gyroplane design over helicopters He started his own company Hafner Gyroplane Co in 1934 and began to design the ARIII Gyroplane This machine was flown for the first in 1935 and widely demonstrated afterwards It incorporated the new principles of cyclic and collective pitch control In an ensuing controversy between proponents of the autogyro and the helicopter Hafner made

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  • Petwood Hotel Woodhall Spa
    and motto Après moi le deluge After me the flood tends homage to the deadly effectiveness of the mission Today the Squadron Bar hosts a range of memorabilia and tributes to Guy Gibson VC Leonard Cheshire VC and their officers Petwood was the scene of some jubilant celebrations with the breakthroughs made by Squadron 617 as well as their tragic losses We can only imagine the sheer bravery of the Squadron and the huge risks they took in enemy territory facing death over and over and again Guy Gibson alone the Squadron s heroic young Wing Commander had carried out over 170 raids by the age of 24 Just two years later he was killed in action During the war period the hotel was also the guest to another great man of aviation history Jimmy Doolittle the leader of the Tokyo raid The Squadron s feats live on at the Petwood Hotel which remains a fascinating tribute to the Dambusters Besides the attacks that destroyed two key dams in the Ruhr area of Germany the Squadron also used cutting edge Earthquake bombs to score critical hits on the warship Tirpitz and various other key targets including bridges shelters and channels In 2010 it was also uncovered that they were being considered for a special mission to target Mussolini himself Petwood Hotel an historic place Aerial view Google earth BBMF tribute to Petwood Hotel Courtesy Petwood The part of the Barnes Wallis traing Dam bomb Some of the paint and drawing discovered all around in the hotel 617 Squadron crest Centenary of the 14 Squadron fair held at Petwood The famons Petwood Hotel staircase So British comfort The officer bar with thousand of souvenirs Sinking the Tirpitz A fabulous collection of pictures documents and signatures The Tirpitz showcase And the Dam attack showcase No doubt this is a place to be for the aviation history fan s Tribute to the glorious Dam Busters at Petwood Hotel The shadow of the Dam Busters remain Some other frames all around the hotel RAF Station Woodhall Spa Officers Mess Petwood Hotel Some heroes were the guest of this place Wing Commander Guy Gibson VC DSO DFC leader of the 617 Sqn Dam Busters Group Captain Leonard Cheshire VC OM DSO DFC and General James Jimmy Doolittle leader of the famlous Tokyo raid Woodhall Spa airfield Royal Air Force station Woodhall Spa or more simply RAF Woodhall Spa is a former Royal Air Force station located 2 miles 3 2 km north of Coningsby and 16 miles 26 km south east of Lincoln Lincolnshire History Constructed on farmland 1 2 miles 1 9 km south of Woodhall Spa the station opened in February 1942 as a satellite station to RAF Coningsby In August 1943 it became No 54 Base Substation After the victory in Europe the airfield was used as an assembly and kitting out point for the Tiger Force a proposed heavy bomber force for the far east After the end of the Second

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  • Hanoi Air Museum
    model shot down on December 27th 1972 by Pham Tuan AA 1 Alkali radar guided missile inboard and a AA 2 Atoll IR homing missile Center line tank of the Mig 21MF with local resident MiG 21 PF Fishbed D 4326 of Nguyen Van Coc 921 regiment AA2 Atoll K13 Soviet markings all over the plane SPRD 99 JATO Antonov An 2 This aircraft was used in the attack on a secret US radar site at Phou Pha Thi battle of Lima Site 85 Mig 19SF Farmer Shenyang J 6 Training plane HL 1 The Ministry of Defense and the High Command of Air Force assigned the Institute for Aviation Military Technology to manufacture the coaching plane HL 1 in January 1981 HL 1 was designed based on three models Pilatus P3 of Switzerland Zlin 526 of former Czechoslovakia and Yak 18 of the former USSR Training plane HL 2 Was the second prototype Super light amphibious plane VNS 41 Minister of Defence suggested to manufacture hydroplanes because Vietnam has a long coast and many rivers This is a light hydroplane made by Factory A41 of the Technical Department of Air Defense and Air Force based on Russian Che 22 Korvet Interior of the VNS 41 Mil Mi 4 this was Ho Chi Minh s personal helicopter MiG 21PFM with 12 victory stars painted on its nose one of the victories was US Air Force F 4E 67 0296 shot down on July 5th 1972 by Nguy e n Tian Sâm Center line drop tank North Vietnam roundel Mig 21 PMF exhaust Cessna A 37B Dragonfly South Vietnam Air Force VNAF Northrop F 5E Tiger II South Vietnam Air Force VNAF Bell UH 1 Iroquois H model South Vietnam Air Force VNAF Kamov Ka 25BSH Mil Mi 24 Hind A Mil Mi 24 cockpit UB 32 57 mm rocket pods Douglas A 1 Skyraider South Vietnam Air Force VNAF Mil Mi 6 Hook A Aero L 29 Delfin Cessna U 17A Skywagon Zlin Z 226 Trener TL 1 Tu luc The TL 1 is the first product studied designed and successfully manufactured in 1984 1985 by Vietnamese Air Force Institute TL 1 was tested successfully ten times totaling 102 minutes on the air This is a landmark of the development of the country s aviation technology industry Air Defence Museum Hanoi wrecks and war trophies Some US aircraft engines wreckage McDonnell Douglas F 4 Phantom II B Air Defence Museum Hanoi Anti aircraft weaponry and radar systems S 75 Dvina SA 2 Guideline NATO callsign surface to air missile Fan Song missile control radar SA 2 guidance system with Fan Song radar S 125 Neva Pechora SA 3 Goa NATO callsign surface to air missiles SA 2 Guideline SA 2 Guideline fireboard Bait AZP S 60 57 mm single barrel anti aircraft gun M1939 52 K 85 mm anti aircraft gun KS 19 anti aircraft gun Front ZPU 2 14 5 mm anti aircraft twin guns Back AM SPAAG anti

    Original URL path: http://www.sbap.be/museum/hanoi/hanoi.htm (2016-04-30)
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