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  • Storm Tide 2
    take over and secure the airports Kortrijk Wevelgem saw wartime on November 20 when at 11 30 local time 3 C 130 H assaulted the main runway with military personal to take over and secure the airport together with light German armoured vehicles The latter within the frame of the European collaboration under the aegis of the EUBG European Battle Group This first part unfolded in presence of King Philippe I Steven Vandeput Minister of Defence and high ranking military authorities After the take over and the securisation of the airport Belgian citizens were under heavy protection evacuated by helicopters Afterwards the King went to Harelbeke to witness the extraction of hostages out of the Forrestierstadion which then were evacuated by a NH90 to Beauvechain airbase This large scale exercise took also place in the Liège and Maastricht region allowing the Belgian military personal to perfect their training and to be ready and able to intervene wherever necessary in the world Quite realistic regarding the regular events in Africa and more particularly in Congo well known to our paratroopers After this very intense week for the Belgian troops exercise Storm Tide 2 ended and every phase is now being evaluated to bring forward the strong assets and work on the weaker parts as to constantly enhance the capabilities of our troops and never leave the life s of our fellow countrymen haphazardly November 18th Oostende Landing forces on the way to the coast Courtesy Belgian Navy The operation was in collaboration with the German forces Courtesy Belgian Navy The landing zone Courtesy Belgian Navy Courtesy Belgian Navy The civil people are evacuated and set on board the M921 Lobelia Courtesy Belgian Navy The M916 Bellis was also involved in the operation Courtesy Belgian Navy Ready Duty Ship A950 Valcke Courtesy

    Original URL path: http://www.sbap.be/events/2014/058stormtide2014/058stormtide2014.htm (2016-04-30)
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  • MOD Air Contact
    Reaction Alert aircraft demonstrating the professionality of the crews F 16AM turn around Serge Van Heertum Serge Van Heertum Marc Arys Explanations about the guidance systems by Gen Avi Gerard Van Caelenberge Chief of Defence Serge Van Heertum Serge Van Heertum A view in the cockpit Marc Arys Marc Arys Serge Van Heertum Serge Van Heertum Serge Van Heertum Marc Arys Serge Van Heertum Serge Van Heertum Serge Van Heertum Serge Van Heertum NBC clothes Dog unit and airfield protections Marc Arys Serge Van Heertum FAC material Forward Air Controllers Marc Arys Serge Van Heertum B Hunter overview Serge Van Heertum Interview with the Minister of Defence Steven Vandeput We are talking about budget restrictions up to 20 and the malaise within the army is very present each one fearing for his future Is this situation confirming itself The report of the court of auditors is very clear and the budget put forward by the government will bring important financial worries to all the departments and within the Defence department the situation will be the most critical A strategic plan is under review and one will hace to take some drastic measures but we are talking off a white sheet of paper specified Minister Vandeput At this moment military personnel have nothing to worries about as there will be no purifying at stake but the course towards end of careers and voluntary departures will be the main idea The Minister and his staff are taking all these questions into account and will provide a report to be debated in parliament within the next weeks probably around Eastern 2015 In the same way will the recast of the structures and the renewal of the material be studied to re energize the army which for the minister stays a quality tool and of which the maximum of potential must be drawn The closure of some airbases has been suggested with Florennes and Beauvechain being targeted in the media What is the actual situation Once again nothing has been decided yet These are only ideas being evaluated to ensure the necessary savings It is rightful for the concerned military personnel to have some concerns but all this will be debated once a clear and functional plan is established note Colonel Thierry Dupont base commander of Florennes airbase stays confident To him and at this time nothing indicates a possible closure of the 2nd Tactical Wing The Defence office is well aware that a closure would also generate secondary economical losses in the concerned regions During the mandate of your predecessor the replacement of the F 16 fighter has been mentioned which was already largely spread out in the media with a clear feeling to prefer the American fighter F 35 What is the actual situation regarding the replacement of the F 16 and also of the aging B Hunter unmanned air vehicles Here again the Minister of Defence stayed very evasive not engaging any comment on the subject The study schedule is maintained

    Original URL path: http://www.sbap.be/events/2014/059ebfsmod2014/059ebfsmod2014.htm (2016-04-30)
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  • Rainbow Warrior
    supported by operational and technical means from the 1 Wing at Beauvechain During tactical flights in hostile territory various signals were simulated to warn the crews through the Radar Warning they were locked on or had their communication systems jammed by the enemy A swift and adequate reaction to the threat is mandatory which can be done by f e releasing flares To enhance the realism of this exercise participants beneficiated from the collaboration of JAMCAR from the Koninklijke Luchtmacht allowing through various on board electronic systems to generate and simulate any kind of radar and communication jamming The exercise was most successful and after an intense and active week the crews and personal went back to their home base at Beauvechain with a new baggage of experiences and ready for their next missions in hostile territory Copyright Adj Jozef Vanden Broeck Copyright Adj Jozef Vanden Broeck Copyright Adj Jozef Vanden Broeck Copyright Adj Bart Rosselle Copyright Adj Bart Rosselle Copyright Adj Bart Rosselle Copyright Adj Bart Rosselle Copyright Adj Bart Rosselle Copyright Adj Bart Rosselle 2 Copyright Adj Jozef Vanden Broeck 1 3 Copyright Adj Bart Rosselle Copyright Adj Bart Rosselle Copyright Adj Bart Rosselle Copyright Adj Bart Rosselle

    Original URL path: http://www.sbap.be/events/2014/060rainwar2014/060rainwar2014.htm (2016-04-30)
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  • Free Flight World Masters
    very low cloud cover The cherry on the cake was Capitaine Tao Planche s flight at the controls of the Rafale in this year s NATO Tiger Meet livery For all teams present this was the year s final public display and thus some team member s last flight which produced displays where pleasure was evident and where men and their steeds did their utmost or even more so as to have no regrets Finally and this is a Free Flight World Masters unique trait the show was also on the ground with giant screens showing the displays live live bands on stage the Free Flight Girls whose curves are just as fine as those produced by the aeroplane s smoke pots There was a vast spectator area with displays simulators and photo exhibitions which attracted huge crowds over the two days For the lucky few there was a VIP area where they could relax in a deck chair just a few feet from the water s edge and enjoy the show Your SBAP correspondent was one of those happy few and would like very warmly to thank Laurent and Véronique Cahuzat the Bleu Ciel Airshow bosses who are uncommonly kind attentive and welcoming Thanks to them I had access to all areas and there was an absolute freedom to photograph anything I wanted This was the case for an exceptional picture of the pilots on the runway with an Extra flying a few feet above their heads and for the race with a Subaru at more than 220 km h during the Friday tests Many thanks also to their highly professional team Pschitt Sacco Guillaume I m really looking forward to this highly enjoyable week end in 2015 The giant screen on the beach The organizers know how to create emotions The beach complete with bathers reminder this is October 2 fast machines 2 pilots how can one resist Fortunately there is no hidden speed trap as they are traveling at 220 km h Briefing Aerobatics drawings before each flight the best method plenty of fast hand movements and small models Frank Soubrane Pitts S 2S Franck Soubrane FFWM leader and his Pitts S2 a thoroughbred meant for speed and show Eurocopter Tigre display Their trademark come in very low and strike very hard Pas de deux for this aerial ballet Mist for warm evenings The ever charming hostesses Black Yellow and Red Belgium tribute François Rallet Extra 200 Unusually wearing Hamilton and not EVAA colours Nicolas Ivanoff s display Let there be light Each man has his office Last seconds before diving into the flight Very Low pass Some race around pylons here it s around helos The best VIP seats in the world Hamilton s finest cutlery The Armée de l Air celebrating its 80 years on a giant screen Unlike the photographer she s watching the planes Team Cartouche Doré If you re not in control power is meaningless Is he alone are there 3 of

    Original URL path: http://www.sbap.be/events/2014/055stmax2014/055stmax2014.htm (2016-04-30)
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  • 2014-18 Belgian Air Force
    to Germany and sent its troops to the continent in support of the French and Belgian force But very rapidly the whole country was in German hands which lasted for four years They said Germany occupied Belgium but to this however was a little exception The western side of the country near de Yser and the city of Ieper resisted the invasion of the enemy In 1915 this war became a position s war where each party tried to regain parts of territory at the cost of countless life s This conflict got bogged and became a war of trenches Some battles still resound in our minds like the battle of the Somme the battle of Verdun the battle of the Yser the battle of Passendaele It was a world conflict involving Eastern and African countries as well Even the United States entered this conflict in support of Europe This conflict was terrestrial of course but also naval and aerial Throughout these years the military technologies evolved rapidly and military aviation took a certain rise in Belgium putting some great names forward such as Willy Coppens Jan Olieslagers Fernand Jacquet André de Meulemeester and Edmond Thieffry After four years of blood and terror a wind of change occurred definitively In Germany Guillaume II refused to abdicate which led to protest demonstrations in favour of peace On November 03 1918 mutinies broke out at Kiel seamen refusing to fight a supplementary battle for the honour The revolutionary wave reached whole of Germany and on November 09 G ui llaume II is forced to abdicate and the staff headquarters asking to sign the armistice The government of the new German Republic signed it on November 11 1918 in the woods of Compiègne in the train of Marechal Foch when the Canadian troops launched their last war offensive attacking Mons in Belgium This is just a brief summary of this dark page of our contemporary history and much more articles can be found detailing the various aspects of this war For all the ones that suffered during the World War I 2014 is the starting point of the celebration of the centenary of this war and the world Europe and Belgium in particular organized numerous commemorations events and exhibits An incredible number of publications were edited those last months allowing us to have a better insight in the ins and outs of this great war And of course the Belgian Ministry of Defence is also involved in these commemorations and the Air Force in particular A part of the fleet of the Air Force sports the logo representing the poppy The poppy is a wild growing flower and its red colour stands for the bloodshed of the soldier who gave his life for our freedom These airplanes we can qualify as ambassadors our F 16 solo display the Red devils the fleet of the 15 th Transport Wing C 130H included all do wear this logo and in traveling around the world the

    Original URL path: http://www.sbap.be/events/2014/056specmark2014/056specmark2014.htm (2016-04-30)
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  • BAF New Commanding Officer
    with full afterburner sadly no time to take a decent picture SBAP would like to thank Lieutenant General Van de Voorde for his cooperation during the past five years and good luck with his new job We also wishes all the best to General Major Frederik Vansina Good flight and safe landings to both of you The Standards Col Avi Dejaeger and Belgian Minister of Defence Steven Vandeput Col Avi Dejaeger Col Avi Dejaeger and Lt Gen Avi Claude Van de Voorde A little speech to remember the five past years Lt Gen Van de Voorde during his last inspection of the troops Lt Gen Compernol and the newly appointed Air Component Commander Gen Maj Avi Frederik Vansina Fly by Claude Van de Voorde Frederik Vansina Serge Van Heertum Serge Van Heertum Claude Van de Voorde was born on March 10 1962 After three years at the Royal Cadet School in Brussels he is admitted to the Royal Military School where he graduates in the social and military sciences At the end of 1985 he receives his wings and after his conversion onto the F 16 he is assigned to the 31 th Tiger Squadron at Kleine Brogel airbase ending as the operations officer During his stay he particpates actively in various international exercises and deployments such as the Tactical Leadership Program Red Flag Very Low Level Flying He also earns the license of Fighter Weapons Instructor after an intensive training at Örland Air Station Norway After his second cycle in 1994 he becomes a staff officer at the headquarters of the Tactical Air Force where he takes the responsibility of the section Offensive Operations as well as the desk management and planning Achieving the higher staff course at the Royal defense Institute at Brussels Maj Avi Van De Voorde is appointed commander of the 31 Fighter Bomber Squadron in 1998 and takes actively part in Balkan operations As the Belgian F 16 detachment commander he also flies missions over Bosnia and Kosovo within the frame of operation Allied Force In 2001 he rejoins the section Planning and Programs of the air force staff and is later on appointed to the Strategic Department within the new staff where he is responsible for the long term planning of the Air Component He is promoted Colonel and in January 2004 becomes the military adviser of the Belgian delegation to NATO representing Belgium regarding the armament and nuclear policy Shortly after completing his Senior Course at the Nato Defence College in Rome he is becomes base commander of the 10 th Tactical Wing at Kleine Brogel in 2007 He concludes his time as BaseCo totalizing almost 2 000 flight hours on F 16 On July 23 2009 General Major Aviator Claude Van de Voorde is appointed Commander of the Belgian Air Component and on September 01 2011 also aide de camp Vleugeladjudant of king Albert II He will be the new Director of Operations within the Ministry of Defence Claude Van de Voorde

    Original URL path: http://www.sbap.be/events/2014/057bafcom2014/057bafcom2014.htm (2016-04-30)
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  • Air Race Memories
    42 570 km in 10 days 21 hours 22 minutes G ACSR was renamed Reine Astrid and flew the Christmas mail from Brussels to Leopoldville in the Belgian Congo in 1934 It was then sold to the French government as F ANPY and set a Croydon Le Bourget record of 52 minutes on 5 July 1935 It subsequently made Paris Casablanca and Paris Algiers high speed proving flights F ANPY was destroyed in a hangar fire at Istres in France in June 1940 Black Magic was sold to Portugal for a projected flight from Lisbon to Rio de Janeiro Re registered CS AAJ and renamed Salazar it made various flights from London to Lisbon setting a time of 5 hr 17 min in July 1937 It was re discovered in a ruinous condition in Portugal in 1979 and is currently undergoing restoration in Derby England The de Havilland DH 89 Dragon Rapide was a 1930s British short haul biplane passenger airliner In late 1933 the Dragon Rapide was designed at the de Havilland company as a faster and more comfortable successor to the DH 84 Dragon It was in effect a twin engined scaled down version of the four engined DH 86 Express It shared many common features with the DH 86 Express including its tapered wings streamlined fairings and the Gipsy Six engine but it demonstrated none of the operational vices of the DH 86 Express and went on to become perhaps the most successful British built short haul commercial passenger aircraft of the 1930s The Desoutter Mk I Dolphin was built by the Desoutter Aircraft Company a British aircraft manufacturer based in Croydon It was founded by Marcel Desoutter and produced aircraft during the late 1920s and the 1930s The company was formed in December 1928 to manufacture the designs of the Dutch Koolhoven company in particular the Koolhoven F K 41 which had drawn a lot of attention due to its modern design The licence was obtained and Desoutter set up a production unit at the former ADC factory at Croydon Aerodrome The F K 41 became quite successful and was marketed under the name Dolphin The name Dolphin was later dropped and for a while the aircraft was marketed only under the name Desoutter A slightly modified version was later produced and the versions received the suffixes Mk I and Mk II Desoutter s aircraft became a familiar sight in British flying clubs where they were used for instruction pleasure flights and taxi flights The business folded in 1932 after its main customer National Flying Services at London Air Park Hanworth went into liquidation having produced 41 aircraft twenty eight Mk Is and thirteen Mk IIs The Miles M 3 Falcon is a 1930s British three four seat cabin monoplane aircraft designed by Miles Aircraft Limited The M 3 Falcon was a clean single engined low wing monoplane with trousered main undercarriage and fixed tail wheel designed in 1934 It was structurally similar to the earlier Miles M 2F Hawk Major family but had side by side seating for two behind the pilot in a glazed cockpit It was powered by a 130 hp 97 kW de Havilland Gipsy Major piston engine The prototype G ACTM built by Philips and Powis first flew at Woodley Aerodrome on 12 October 1934 The first production aircraft designated M 3A Falcon Major was flown in January 1935 It had a wider fuselage than the prototype to improve passenger comfort and revised glazing with a forward sloping windscreen The M 3A was somewhat underpowered so the M 3B Falcon Six and later versions were fitted with a 200 hp 150 kW de Havilland Gipsy Six engine The M 3C Falcon Six was a four seater with dual controls The M 3D was strengthened to allow an 11 increase in all up weight compared with the M 3B The final versions were the M 3E and M 3F An enlarged five seat version was developed as the M 4 Merlin The Miles M 2 Hawk Trainer was a 1930s British two seat training monoplane designed by Miles Aircraft Limited The Miles Hawk Trainer was developed from the Hawk Major to meet a requirement to supplement the de Havilland Tiger Moth in the training role The aircraft had dual controls blind flying equipment and vacuum operated flaps In 1937 the design was further developed to meet an Air Ministry specification for a trainer and became the M 14 Magister The de Havilland DH 80A Puss Moth is a British three seater high wing monoplane aeroplane designed and built by the de Havilland Aircraft Company between 1929 and 1933 It flew at a speed approaching 124 mph 200 km h making it one of the highest performance private aircraft of its era The unnamed DH 80 prototype which first flew in September 1929 was designed for the flourishing private flying movement in the United Kingdom It was a streamlined all wooden aircraft fitted with the new de Havilland Gipsy III inverted inline engine that gave unimpeded vision across the nose without the protruding cylinder heads of the earlier Gipsy II engine After the prototype was tested the aircraft was redesigned with a fabric covered steel tube fuselage and as such redesigned the DH 80A Puss Moth The first production aircraft flew in March 1930 and was promptly sent on a sales tour of Australia and New Zealand Orders came quickly and in the three years of production ending in March 1933 259 were manufactured in England An additional 25 aircraft were built by de Havilland Canada Most were fitted with the 130 hp 97 kW Gipsy Major engine that gave slightly better performance The Puss Moth was replaced on the production line by the de Havilland DH 85 Leopard Moth that with a plywood fuselage was both cheaper to build and lighter weight Being lighter the Leopard Moth had better performance on the same rather modest 130 hp 97 kW Gipsy Major engine The Percival Mew Gull was a British racing aircraft of the 1930s It was a small single engine single seat low wing monoplane of wooden construction normally powered by a six cylinder de Havilland Gipsy Six piston engine During its racing career it set many records and was considered a significant efficient design one that eventually reached a top speed of 265 mph 425 km h on a modest 205 hp 153 kW in its final 1939 form A modern day observer has characterised the Mew Gull as The Holy Grail of British air racing During the second half of the 1930s Mew Gulls were dominant in air racing in the UK and consistently recorded the fastest times until the outbreak of war stopped all civilian flying in late 1939 With the Percival Gull already making a name for itself as a racer over several months in 1933 1934 Capt Edgar W Percival designed and built a single seat racer derivative initially named the E1 Mew Gull This was developed into the E2 E2H and the E3H variants between 1934 and 1938 The sometimes used designation P6 is incorrect this retrospective tag was created after Percival left the company and long after the Mew Gulls were built thus no Mew Gulls were ever built as P6s With the exception of the sole E3H G AFAA which was built after the company moved to Luton all of the Mew gulls were built in the small factory at Gravesend It should be noted that the E3H whilst very strongly visually resembling the E2H was in truth a totally new and different machine with each element differing from its predecessor in some way It was most certainly not a clipped wing version of the E2H as it has sometimes been described Structurally there was very little commonality of parts between the Gulls IV VI Vega Gull and the Mew Gull other than a few minor components All of the Gulls however did use a similar generic structure Proprietary equipment such as engines airscrews spinners instruments undercarriage legs wheels and tires were generally common to all series The Mew Gulls apart from the E1 in its initial configuration used a fixed conventional oleomatic main undercarriage and a fully castoring tailskid Small manually operated split trailing edge wing flaps were incorporated into the mainlines but were singularly ineffective even when fully extended The aircraft was designed for handicapped air racing which gained huge popularity in the UK during the 1920s and especially 1930s the so called Golden Age of aviation The King s Cup Race an annual handicapped air racing event developed to aid in the development of British light aircraft was considered to be the Blue Riband event Ultimately Mew Gulls went on to win this event four times The prototype G ACND first flew in March 1934 with a 165 hp Napier Javelin but it was replaced with a more powerful and reliable 200 hp Gipsy Six engine fitted with a fixed pitch airscrew prior to its first race The Van s RV 7 and RV 7A are two seat single engine low wing homebuilt airplanes sold in kit form by Van s Aircraft The RV 7 is the tail wheel equipped version while the RV 7A features a nose wheel The RV 7 is the replacement for the RV 6 and is externally similar to the earlier model with longer wings larger fuel tanks and a larger rudder to improve spin recovery characteristics The designer of the Van s aircraft line Richard Van Grunsven designed the RV 7 series as a replacement for the RV 6 The RV 6 itself was a two seat side by side development of the RV 4 which was in turn a two seat version of the single seat RV 3 The RV 7 incorporated many changes as a result of lessons learned over the years in producing over 2 000 RV 6 kits The RV 7 airframe will accept larger engines including the Lycoming IO 360 up to 200 hp 149 kW The RV 7 also has increased wingspan and wing area over the RV 6 as well as more headroom legroom and an increased useful load The RV 7 carries a total of 42 US gallons of fuel up from 38 US gallons on the RV 6 The RV 7 shares many common parts with the RV 8 and RV 9 which reduces production costs The RV 7 also uses computer assisted design to produce a kit with pre punched rivet holes thus greatly reducing assembly time for the builder Construction time is estimated at about 1500 hours for an average builder The RV 7A version features a hardened solid steel nose wheel strut that fits into a tube welded to the engine mount As in all nose wheel equipped RV aircraft the nose wheel is free castering and the aircraft is steered with differential braking or rudder at higher taxi speeds The brakes are conventional toe brakes In 2013 1291 RV 7s and RV 7As had been completed and were flying The Elliots Primary EoN or EoN Type 7 S G 38 Primary was a training glider developed in the UK shortly after World War II It was an absolutely minimalist aircraft consisting of a high strut braced wing connected to a conventional empennage by an open truss framework and was a copy of the German SG 38 Schulgleiter Marketed to aeroclubs the Primary EoN was also adopted in 1948 by the Air Training Corps and by the Combined Cadet Force under the name Eton TX 1 The Hawker Cygnet was a British ultralight biplane aircraft of the 1920s The aircraft were of wood and fabric construction the fuselage being four longerons strutted in the fashion of a Warren girder The wing was two box spars with Warren truss ribs Initially the two aircraft were powered one by an Anzani and the other by an ABC Scorpion both opposed twin cylinder engines In 1926 the engines in both Cygnets were changed to Bristol Cherub III another two cylinder engine The airframe weighed a remarkably low 270 lb and its weight when empty was only 373 lb s The English Electric Wren was a 1920s British ultralight monoplane built by the English Electric Company Limited at Lytham St Annes Lancashire The Wren designed by William Manning was one of the first ultralight aircraft Bill Manning was a designer of flying boats and decided to try a simpler project The Wren was a single engined high wing monoplane with an empty weight of only 232 lb 105 kg The first aircraft Serial Number J6973 was built in 1921 for the Air Ministry Interest in building very light aircraft was encouraged at the time by a 500 prize offered by the Duke of Sutherland who was the Under Secretary of State for Air The entrants had to build the most economical light single seat aircraft Another incentive was a 1 000 prize offered by the Daily Mail for the longest flight by a motor glider with an engine of not more than 750 cc Two aircraft were built for the 1923 Lympne light aircraft trials in October 1923 The Wren shared the first prize with the ANEC I when it covered 87 5 miles 140 8 km on one Imperial gallon 4 5 litres of fuel In 1957 the third aircraft was rebuilt using parts of the second aircraft It is still airworthy and is on public display at the Shuttleworth Collection at Old Warden Aerodrome in Bedfordshire The Taylor JT 2 Titch was a 1960s British fixed wing aircraft design for a homebuilt aircraft by J F Taylor As a result of request for an aircraft with higher performance than the Taylor Monoplane of 1959 John F Taylor designed a high performance single seater the Titch Taylor built the prototype registered G ATYO at Leigh on Sea Essex between 1965 and 1966 The Titch first flew at Southend Airport on 4 January 1967 It s all wood construction is similar to the Monoplane but has fewer metal fittings than the earlier design and full size wing rib plans are supplied for the tapered wing panels With a cruise speed in the region of 160 mph 260 km h it is an effective cross country touring aircraft and is also fully aerobatic Builders can fit either a Continental or Lycoming engine The Titch was named after the test pilot who first flew the Taylor Monoplane O V Titch Holmes John Taylor was killed when the prototype Titch crashed at Southend on the 16 May 1967 The marketing of plans for both his aircraft designs were taken on by his wife and later his son The LeVier Cosmic Wind was a small single engine single seat racing monoplane designed and built by staff of the Lockheed Corporation in 1947 It did not race successfully in the US but one won the premier cross country competition in the UK in 1964 The Cosmic Wind was designed and built by Lockheed s chief test pilot Tony LeVier and a group of Lockheed engineers A very small single seat racer it was aimed at the Goodyear Trophy for Formula 1 class racers initiated in the US soon after World War II It is an all metal low wing cantilever monoplane Wings and tail surfaces are all straight edged and tapered The ailerons are full span and carry trim tabs as does the full fin depth rudder The undercarriage is fixed with streamlined main legs and wheels in long fairings The roller tail wheel is tucked into the rear corner of the fuselage behind the rudder The cockpit is enclosed with a small single piece perspex canopy The first aircraft were powered by 85 hp 63 kW Continental C 85 horizontally opposed engines but more recently at least four have used the 100 hp 75 kW Continental O 200 A The engine installation includes a large pointed spinner and long bulbous cylinder head exhaust fairings Westland Lysander Mk III G AZWT V9367 The Collection s Lysander was built in Canada and was used by the RCAF as a target tug serialled 2355 It was bought after the war by Wes Agnew a farmer former RCAF instructor and collector of aircraft In 1971 it was purchased by Sir William Roberts for the Strathallan Collection in Scotland It arrived in the UK in October 1971 and was registered G AZWT and work commenced on restoring it However it was not until December 1979 that G AZWT flew again painted as V9441 a Lysander operated by No 309 Polish Squadron It was grounded in 1986 and was purchased in 1998 by the Shuttleworth Collection It has been fully restored repainted and fitted with dummy long range fuel tank and ladder to represent V9367 MA B an aircraft of 161 Squadron flown by Pilot Officer Peter Vaughan Fowler on operation Apollo during the winter of 1942 In it s all black colours it makes an unusual sight in the skies over Old Warden and is the last airworthy example of this historic type Height 14ft 6in Length 30ft 6in Wingspan 50ft Engine one 870hp Bristol Mercury XX 9 cylinder radial Max Speed 230mph Armament two machine guns mounted in undercarriage fairings Hawker Sea Hurricane Mk1B G BKTH Z7015 The Hawker Sea Hurricane was a variant of the Hawker Hurricane During World War II the Fleet Air Arm took on charge some 440 Sea Hurricanes 60 of which were built new as Sea Hurricanes and the rest were conversions from former RAF Hurricanes some of which dated from 1938 The Sea Hurricane was initially deployed not for aircraft carrier operations but to protect merchant shipping To combat German maritime reconnaissance bombers some ships were converted into CAMs catapult aircraft merchantmen which meant that a Hurricane fighter could be launched from the ship when danger approached The biggest problem was that the fighter could not re land on board and so the pilot had to ditch it in the sea The main areas of operation for the Hurricat or Catafighters were in the Mediterranean and Baltic Later versions of the Sea Hurricane operated from aircraft carriers being fitted usually with catapult spools and arrester hook but by 1943 the Sea Hurricane had all but disappeared from service Gloster Gladiator Mk I G AMRK L8032 was the last production Gladiator I built in 1937 but not actually assembled until 1938 In 1948 it together Gladiator II N5903 was bought by Glosters In 1950 the two were delivered to Air Service Training for use as instructional airframes at Hamble and Ansty When Ansty closed the aircraft were bought by Viv Bellamy for a nominal sum L8032 was restored using the engine from N5903 and flew again as G AMRK L8032 was bought back by Glosters in 1953 and in 1956 they decided to put it back to full military specification in 72 Squadron markings albeit with the fictitious serial K8032 When Gloster Aircraft closed the Gladiator was presented to the Shuttleworth Collection for safe keeping on 7th November 1960 In 1990 the aircraft was repainted in a camouflage scheme with No 247 Squadron codes and wore these until a fabric recover was carried out in 1996 Part of the restoration work was funded by donations in memory of the late Robin Bowes a good friend and champion of the Collection who was killed flying his Fokker DR1 replica on Sunday 20th July 1995 When finished the Gladiator emerged in Norweigian colours for filming In 2007 it re appeared as K7985 of 73 Squadron RAF this aircraft was flown by the WW2 Ace Cobber Kain at the 1937 Hendon Air Pageant The de Havilland DH 60 Moth is a 1920s British two seat touring and training aircraft that was developed into a series of aircraft by the de Havilland Aircraft Company The DH 60 was developed from the larger DH 51 biplane The first flight of the Cirrus powered prototype DH 60 Moth registration G EBKT was carried out by Geoffrey de Havilland at the works airfield at Stag Lane on 22 February 1925 The Moth was a two seat biplane of wooden construction it had a plywood covered fuselage and fabric covered surfaces a standard tail plane with a single tail plane and fin A useful feature of the design was its folding wings which allowed owners to hangar the aircraft in much smaller spaces The then Secretary of State for Air Sir Samuel Hoare became interested in the aircraft and the Air Ministry subsidized five flying clubs and equipped them with Moths The prototype was modified with a horn balanced rudder as used on the production aircraft and was entered into the 1925 King s Cup Race flown by Alan Cobham Deliveries commenced to flying schools in England One of the early aircraft was fitted with an all metal twin float landing gear to become the first Moth seaplane The original production Moths were later known as Cirrus I Moths Three aircraft were modified for the 1927 King s Cup Race with internal modifications and a Cirrus II engine on a lowered engine mounting The original designation of DH 60X for experimental was soon changed to Cirrus II Moth the DH 60X designation was re used in 1928 for the Cirrus III powered version with a split axle The production run for the DH 60X Moth was short as it was replaced by later variants but it was still available to special order Although the Cirrus engine was reliable its manufacture was not It depended on components salvaged from World War I era 8 cylinder Renault engines and therefore its numbers were limited by the stockpiles of surplus Renaults Therefore de Havilland decided to replace the Cirrus with a new engine built by his own factory In 1928 when the new de Havilland Gipsy I engine was available a company DH 60 Moth G EBQH was re engined as the prototype of the DH 60G Gipsy Moth Next to the increase in power the main advantage of this update was that the Gipsy was a completely new engine available in as great a number as the manufacture of Moths necessitated The new Gipsy engines could simply be built in house on a production line side by side with the production line for Moth airframes This also enabled de Havilland to control the complete process of building a Moth airframe engine and all streamline productivity and in the end lower manufacturing costs While the original DH 60 was offered for a relatively modest 650 by 1930 the price of a new Gipsy powered Moth was still 650 this in spite of its state of the art engine and the effects of inflation A metal fuselage version of the Gipsy Moth was designated the DH 60M Moth and was originally developed for overseas customers particularly Canada The DH 60M was also licence built in Australia Canada the United States and Norway Also in 1931 a variant of the DH 60M was marketed for military training as the DH 60T Moth Trainer In 1931 with the upgrade of the Gipsy engine as the Gipsy II de Havilland inverted the engine and re designated it the Gipsy III The engine was fitted into a Moth aircraft which was re designated the DH 60G III Moth Major The sub type was intended for the military trainer market and some of the first aircraft were supplied to the Swedish Air Force The DH 60T was re engined with the Gipsy III and was re designated the DH 60T Tiger Moth The DH 60T Tiger Moth was modified with swept back main planes the cabane struts were also moved forward to improve egress from the front cockpit in case of emergency The changes were considered great enough that the aircraft was re designated the de Havilland DH 82 Tiger Moth The Comper C L A 7 Swift is a British 1930s single seat sporting aircraft produced by Comper Aircraft Company Ltd of Hooton Park Cheshire In March 1929 Flight Lieutenant Nicholas Comper left the Royal Air Force and formed the Comper Aircraft Company to build an aircraft he had designed the Comper Swift He had previously designed and flown three aircraft for the Cranwell Light Aeroplane Club the C L A 2 C L A 3 and C L A 4 The prototype Swift registered G AARX first flew at Hooton Park in January 1930 The aircraft was a small single seat braced high wing monoplane constructed of fabric covered spruce wood frames The first Swift was powered by a 40 hp 30 kW ABC Scorpion piston engine After successful tests seven more aircraft were built in 1930 powered by a 50 hp Salmson A D 9 radial engine Trials with Pobjoy P radial engine for use in air racing resulted in all the subsequent aircraft being powered by the Pobjoy R The last three factory built aircraft sometimes called the Gipsy Swift were fitted with de Havilland Gipsy engines two with 120 hp 89 kW Gipsy Major III and one with a 130 hp 97 kW Gipsy Major One of the Gipsy Swifts owned by the then Prince of Wales and future King Edward VIII won second place in the 1932 King s Cup Race while being flown by his personal pilot Postwar surviving Swifts continued to compete successfully in UK air races into the mid 1950s The Chilton D W 1 is a British light sporting monoplane designed and built in the late 1930s by Chilton Aircraft at Hungerford Berkshire The Chilton D W 1 was designed and built on the Chilton Lodge estate at Leverton near Hungerford in Berkshire in early 1937 by two ex de Havilland Technical School students who formed Chilton Aircraft Limited for the purpose The aircraft was intended to be cheap to build and operate yet have an exceptional performance on low power This was derived from its aerodynamically clean design with an all wood airframe with plywood skin Only the control surfaces and the trailing edge of the wing behind the rear spar were fabric covered The wing also carried trailing edge split flaps The undercarriage was enclosed in trouser fairings and a cabin top could be fitted The Miles Hawk Major was a 1930s British two seat light monoplane designed by Miles Aircraft Limited The Hawk Major was designed as a successor to the Miles Hawk by F G Miles Main changes were a de Havilland Gipsy III engine metal instead of wood engine mount and trousered undercarriage The prototype designated M 2F Hawk Major was first flown in 1934 and went on to second place in the 1934 King s Cup Race at an average speed of 147 78 mph A racing version was developed as the one off single seat M 2E Gipsy Six Hawk with a 200 hp de Havilland Gipsy Six engine The production Hawk Major had the 130 hp de Havilland Gipsy Major engine The aircraft sold well to private owners including two that were fitted with smoke generators to allow them to be used as skywriters An improved version the M 2H with a trailing edge flap replaced the M 2F on the production line A number of special one off racing versions were also built In October 1934 Squadron Leader Malcolm Charles McGregor flew a Hawk Major from RAF Mildenhall to Melbourne Australia in 7 days 15 hours while competing in the MacRobertson Air Race In 1936 Miles Hawk VI G ADOD was entered into the Schlesinger Race from Portsmouth to Johannesburg and flown by A E Clouston who nearly made it all the way to Johannesburg but had to make a forced crash landing due to engine trouble 150 miles south of Salisbury In 1935 an improved version for training use was developed as the Miles Hawk Trainer The Miles M 11 Whitney Straight was a 1930s British two seat cabin monoplane with dual controls The M 11 Whitney Straight was designed by F G Miles of Philips and Powis as the result of collaboration with Whitney Straight a Grand Prix motor racing driver aviator and businessman The aim was to provide comfortable accommodation for pilot passenger and luggage in an enclosed side by side cockpit It was a low wing monoplane with fixed main undercarriage in aerodynamic fairings plus a fixed tail wheel Construction was mainly of wood with spruce frames and three ply birch covering and the wings had vacuum operated split flaps It was initially powered by a 130 hp 97 kW de Havilland Gipsy Major I piston engine The sole M 11B was powered by a 135 hp 101 kW Amherst Villiers Maya I engine adding 10 mph 16 km h to its maximum speed and 200 ft min 60 m min to its rate of climb A single M 11C was powered by a 145 hp 108 kW de Havilland Gipsy Major II engine and variable pitch propeller The Miles M 14 Magister was a British two seat monoplane basic trainer aircraft built by the Miles Aircraft for the Royal Air Force and Fleet Air Arm Affectionately known as the Maggie the Magister was based on Miles civilian Hawk Major and Hawk Trainer and was the first monoplane designed specifically as a trainer for the RAF As a low wing monoplane it was an ideal introduction to the Spitfire and Hurricane for new pilots Its sister design the Miles Master was an advanced trainer also built by Phillips Powis at Woodley The Miles M 14 was designed to meet Air Ministry Specification T 40 36 and was first flown on 20 March 1937 by F G Miles and then christened Magister Based on Miles Hawk Trainer the Magister is an open cockpit low wing cantilever monoplane of spruce structure covered in plywood The wing center section has no dihedral and is of constant section with outer sections having dihedral and tapering towards the tip It has a fixed tailwheel undercarriage with spats on the main wheels Split flaps are fitted as standard Early Magisters including the first prototype suffered a number of accidents when the aircraft could not be recovered from a spin To solve this problem the tailplane was raised by 6 inches 15 cm anti spin strakes fitted to the rear fuselage and eventually a new taller rudder Thus modified the aircraft became the definitive M 14A Notwithstanding the relatively large number built contemporary glues used to assemble the wooden aircraft have not stood the test of time and few survive today The Spartan 7W Executive was an aircraft produced by the Spartan Aircraft Company during the late 1930s and early 1940s The 7W features an all metal fuselage as well as a retractable undercarriage The 7W Executive was popular with affluent buyers worldwide Designed for comfort the interior of the 7W was spacious and featured 18 in 46 cm of slide back seat room for front seat passengers arm rests ash trays dome lighting deep cushions cabin heaters ventilators soundproofing large windows and interior access to the 100 lbs 45 kg capacity luggage compartment Built during the Great Depression the 7W was the brainchild of company founder William G Skelly of Skelly Oil who desired a fast comfortable aircraft to support his tastes and those of his rich oil executive colleagues The Executive s high performance allowed the aircraft to compete in the 1939 Bendix Air Races piloted by Arlene Davis where it earned fifth place A military variant of the 7W Executive with a greenhouse canopy covering a tandem cockpit was produced by Spartan with a more powerful 600 hp 447 kW Pratt Whitney Wasp engine and named the Spartan 8W Zeus The Royal Aircraft Factory S E 5 was a British biplane fighter aircraft of the First World War The first examples reached the Western Front before the Sopwith Camel Although it had a much better overall performance than the Camel problems with its Hispano Suiza engine particularly the geared output H S 8B powered early versions mostly using four blade propellers meant that there was a chronic shortage of S E 5s until well into 1918 and fewer squadrons were equipped with the S E 5 than with the Sopwith fighter Together with the Camel the S E 5 was instrumental in regaining allied air superiority in mid 1917 and maintaining it for the rest of the war ensuring there was no repetition of Bloody April 1917 when losses in the Royal Flying Corps were much heavier than in the Luftstreitkräfte The S E 5 Scout Experimental 5 was designed by Henry P Folland John Kenworthy and Major Frank Goodden of the Royal Aircraft Factory in Farnborough It was built around the new 150 hp 112 kW Hispano Suiza 8a V8 engine that while providing excellent performance was initially under developed and unreliable The first of three prototypes flew on 22 November 1916 The first two prototypes were lost in crashes the first killing the chief test pilot at the Royal Aircraft Factory Major F W Goodden on 28 January 1917 due to a weakness in their wing design The third prototype underwent modification before production commenced the S E 5 was known in service as an exceptionally strong aircraft which could be dived at very high speed the squarer wings also gave much improved lateral control at low airspeeds Like the other significant Royal Aircraft Factory aircraft of the war B E 2 F E 2 and R E 8 the S E 5 was inherently stable making it an excellent gunnery platform but it was also quite maneuverable It was one of the fastest aircraft of the war at 138 mph 222 km h equal at least in speed to the SPAD S XIII and faster than any standard German type of the period While the S E 5 was not as agile and effective in a tight dog fight as the Camel it was much easier and safer to fly particularly for novice pilots The S E 5 had one synchronized 303 in Vickers machine gun to the Camel s two but it also had a wing mounted Lewis gun on a Foster mounting which enabled the pilot to fire at an enemy aircraft from below as well as providing two guns firing forward This was much appreciated by the pilots of the first S E 5 squadrons as the new hydraulic link C C synchronizing gear for the Vickers was unreliable at first The Vickers gun was mounted on the forward left dorsal surface of the fuselage with the breech inside the cockpit The cockpit was set amidships making it difficult to see over the long front fuselage but otherwise visibility was good Perhaps its greatest advantage over the Camel was its superior performance at altitude making it a much better match for the Fokker D VII when that fighter arrived at the front The Shuttleworth Collection F904 G EBIA This airplane was built by Wolseley Motors and issued to No 84 Squadron RAF in France in November 1918 It was in action on 10th November piloted by Major C E M Pickthorn MC the squadron commander when he successfully destroyed a Fokker DVII in the vicinity of Chimay in Belgium Post war the now surplus aircraft was bought with others by Major J C Savage for his skywriting business and registered G EBIA used from 1924 to 1928 when it was put into store In 1955 it was recovered from storage up in the roof of the Armstrong Whitworth flight shed at Baginton and restored for the Collection by staff and apprentices at RAE Farnborough flying again in August 1959 fitted with a geared Hispano Suiza When the crankshaft of this engine sheared in flight in 1975 the aircraft was rebuilt with a 200 hp Wolseley Viper Extensively refurbished in 2007 the SE5a

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  • Melsbroek Giant
    from Canada to Ireland in September 2001 and a variety of other oversized cargoes The aircraft is able to kneel to allow easier front loading and has an onboard overhead crane capable of lifting up to 30 tons of cargo and items up to 120 tons can be winched on board Up to 150 tons 150 long tons 170 short tons of cargo can be carried in a military An 124 it can also carry 88 passengers in an upper deck behind the wing center section The cargo compartment of An 124 is 36 6 4 4 4 m 118 21 14 feet about 20 larger than the main cargo compartment of the C 5 Galaxy which is 36 91 5 79 4 09 m 121 1 19 0 13 4 feet Due to limited pressurization in the main cargo compartment 24 6 kPa 3 57 psi it seldom carries paratroopers Pilots have stated that the An 124 is light on the controls and easy to handle for an aircraft of this size Some airports require pavement protection from the heat and blast effects of the An 124 s auxiliary power unit Lotarev D 18T cutaway Operational history Germany led the recent effort to lease An 124 for NATO strategic airlift requirements Two aircraft are leased from SALIS GmbH as a stopgap until the Airbus A400M is available Under NATO SALIS program NAMSA is chartering six An 124 100 transport aircraft According to the contract An 124 100 of Antonov Airlines and Volga Dnepr are used within the limits of NATO SALIS program to carry cargo by requests of 18 countries Belgium Hungary Greece Denmark Canada Luxembourg Netherlands Norway United Kingdom Poland Portugal Slovakia Slovenia Finland France Germany Czech Republic and Sweden Two An 124 100 are constantly based on full time charter in the Leipzig Halle airport but the contract specifies that if necessary two more aircraft will be provided on a six days notice and another two on nine days notice The aircraft proved extremely useful for NATO especially with ongoing operations in Iraq and Afghanistan United Launch Alliance ULA contracts the An 124 to transport the Atlas V launch vehicle from its facilities in Decatur Alabama to Cape Canaveral ULA also uses the An 124 to transport the Atlas V launch vehicle and Centaur upper stage from their manufacturing facility in Denver Colorado to Cape Canaveral and Vandenberg Air Force Base Two flights are required to transfer each launch vehicle one for the Atlas V main booster stage and another for the Centaur upper stage It is also contracted by Space Systems Loral to transport satellites from Palo Alto CA to the Arianespace spaceport in Kourou French Guyana Airbus Transport International a subsidiary of Airbus has selected another Russian cargo company Polet Airlines as designated carrier to the company Polet Airlines expects that its three An 124 100 will transport astronautic equipment manufactured by EADS which is Airbus parent company and components of the Airbus A380 The

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